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Although there is not a general legal prohibition on working alone the broad duties of the health and safety at work act and the management of health and safety at regulations still apply.

Working alone is not in itself against the law, and it will often be safe to do so, however, the law requires employers and others to think about and deal with any health and safety risks and or hazards of the work before people should be allowed to work alone.

Employers have responsibility for the health, safety and welfare at work of all of their employees. They are also responsible for the health and safety of those affected by work activities, for example, any self-employed people they engage and visitors such as contractors.

These responsibilities cannot be transferred to any other person, including those people who work alone. It is the employer’s duty to assess risks to lone workers and take steps to avoid or control risks where necessary.

Employees have responsibilities to take reasonable care of themselves and other people affected by their work activities and to co-operate with their employers in meeting their legal obligations.